Screening Room March 2014: Shorts from Wellington

Source: Show Me Shorts Film Festival – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Screening Room March 2014: Shorts from Wellington

A classic view of the Wellington cable car and harbour, courtesy of Brett Taylor (CC License)

 
A classic view of the Wellington cable car and harbour, courtesy of Brett Taylor (CC License)

Hi, my name is Stephanie Charles and I’m the Global Markets Manager at StarNow, an online talent community.

 
As a ground-breaking, inclusive, and accessible platform for exciting and engaging storytelling, shorts films are a great way for our talented filmmakers to enter the industry. They also give actors the chance to hone their skills! An art form in their own right, short films are becoming more readily recognized as an important developmental platform for creatives.  

 
In this edition of the Screening Room, I’ll be looking at short films that were either shot in Wellington or were made by Wellington filmmakers. Wellington has seen a massive change in its industry over the years, and is now really hitting its stride. It’s even been named the “world’s coolest little film capital”! StarNow is very proud to be based here, so I thought I’d shine a spotlight on some amazing Wellington films.

The Audition

Director: Anna Campion, 1989

This little-known gem was shot in and around Wellington. There is a great shot of Wellington’s Evans Bay right at the start. Anna Campion directs her mother Edith and younger sister Jane in this slyly observed short: a re-imagining of Edith’s (reluctant) audition for a small role in Jane’s An Angel at My Table. From when Edith picks Jane up at the airport en route to her Otaki home, the professional and personal roles blur. Anxiety, huffs and matriarchal needling ensue as an often comic, sometimes poignant domestic tango between the former stage actress and film director that Jane plays out in front of the camera.
 


 

Tama Tū

Director: Taika Waititi, 2004

Taika is one of Wellington’s most recognised young filmmakers and an inspiration to many who are just starting out and trying to find their feet.  Before Taika was known for his feature films Eagle vs Shark and Boy, he made some amazing short films, and this is one of them. Tama Tū is a stunning short film which was shot in the rubble of the old Wellington hospital. It won international acclaim with an honourable mention at Sundance and a special jury prize at the Berlin Film Festival. Six Māori Battalion soldiers camped in Italian ruins wait for night to fall. In the silence, the bros-in-arms distract themselves with jokes. A tohu (sign) brings them back to reality and they gather to say a karakia before returning to the fray.
 
(Click to watch through NZOnScreen)
Tama Tū
 

Betty Banned Sweets

Director: Michelle Savill, 2008

Michelle is a very exciting up-and-coming director whose more recent short films are shining on the world stage. This is one of her first short films and was made as part of a Wintec Bachelor of Media Arts course in 2007. Betty Banned Sweets also won selection to Melbourne, Rotterdam and Clermont-Ferrand film festivals. Benjamin lives at home with his Mum, but the 23-year-old dreams of escaping the nest for some overseas experience. While pondering ‘should I stay or should I go?’, he retreats to his studio and creates intricate shoe-box dioramas of his destinations; meanwhile, his mother plans an (unwanted) birthday party for him.
 


 

These 3 short films are just a small taste of the talented filmmakers that come from the Wellington region and the beauty and diversity which the region has to offer. Sometimes we forget that Wellington is more than just Middle Earth!

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

The Indeterminable Horrors of Kiyoshi Kurosawa

Source: Madman Films – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: The Indeterminable Horrors of Kiyoshi Kurosawa

With the release of Real on disc & digital platforms this month, regular Madman contributor and Twitchfilm critic Kwenton Bellette takes an important look back at the dark mind of Kiyoshi Kurosawa and his unconventional use of horror in order to understand why he has made his most accessible genre effort yet, and more importantly, how he has kept to his roots.

 

A dark minded Kurosawa ponders.

 

Madman’s Eastern Eye label are great admirers of Kiyoshi Kurosawa and a decent chunk of his best work is available here on DVD; from his early masterpiece Cure, the murder mystery Retribution and the remade zeitgeist techno horror Pulse.

Each film approaches horror in a wholly original and psychological way. This permeates and affects many in his films, but it’s his doomed and flawed protagonists, conduits for grand societal statements, that suffer the most.

 

 

In Pulse, it is the rise of communicating through technology and the subsequent disconnection from reality that literally haunts a group of divided friends and later the world as the terror proliferates.

The film is a crystal ball of sorts, and the evil depicted in the film oppresses the post-modern world much like the devices that have advanced and taken over almost every waking hour of our own lives today.

In hindsight and given our reliance on social networking and mobile applications this film is more terrifying than ever.

 

What imprints do we leave, and where?

 

 

Retribution is a more straight-forward narrative about a murder, and yet it has a twisted twinge of sadism throughout. Bringing to mind the works of David Fincher (Seven, Zodiac), we follow a grisly murder case that turns on its head when the protagonist Detective Yoshioka (Koji Yakusho) is presumed to be the murderer and begins to believe so himself as the evidence mysteriously piles up, despite having no knowledge of the victim.

 

Broken and haunted.

 

 

Cure is a straight-up masterpiece and easily one of the scariest movies to emerge from the J-horror trend other than The Ring. Utilizing a mysterious stranger who controls the elements as the protagonist, this young and charismatic man slowly makes his way around a sedate decaying Tokyo, unleashing the potential of the evil inherent in all of us.

It is hard to discuss the film without spoiling it, but Kurosawa has basically captured the very believable notion that we are all capable of doing horrific things and committing terrible acts at a moment’s notice. He defines the line that we can all cross if not driven by reason and other human mechanisms.

 

Kurosawa captures the darkness even in the most generic locations.

 

This concept of the evil and darkness in man arguably reaches its apex and scope in the stunningly damning Tokyo Sonata. Channeling Ozu but in the modern day, Kiyoshi reveals an unflinching modern Tokyo and a hapless family undergoing middle class stresses.

After the spineless patriarch of this already troubled family unit loses his job (the brilliant Teruyuki Kagawa), everything disintegrates and the ugliness behind Japan’s societal systems and pressures of expectations are explicitly revealed.

The film goes to absurd lengths to criticize Japan’s urban malaise, and it succeeds effortlessly.

 

Unemployment ignites the spark for a greater crisis.

 

 

Kurosawa’s latest film Real may be his most conventional yet; utilizing sci-fi tropes, popular actors and a straight story he delivers a reasonably simple palette of expected fare. However, despite the mainstream appeal, like his past works, that horror is there, and it strikes in the worst place possible – in the literal mind.

Koichi (Satoh Takeru) undergoes a radical experiment led by the beautiful but elusive Dr. Aihara (Miki Nakatani), the aim is to reach out and hopefully awaken his girlfriend Atsumi (Haruka Ayase) from a mysterious coma.

Reaching into her dreams and memories brings to mind (pun intended) films like Inception and even The Cell. Oddly, Kurosawa focuses little on the actual act of slipping between reality and the subconscious. The ambling conversations and muddled focus is not exactly riveting viewing. However the viewer should understand that this is the point.

Koichi becomes another victim of Kurosawa’s vicious narrative; he is another doomed, confused and broken protagonist, although this time there is perhaps a light at the end of the tunnel in Real.

The usual murky and dim aesthetic of Kurosawa’s films may have changed to a clinical white in Real, but like the bizarre terrors that interrupt the unconscious parts of the film the monsters are still there, still add to the mystery and still urge the viewer down the deep dark path Kurosawa has set out for them.

 

The horror will never really subside.

 

Real is out now on disc & digital platforms.

 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

Opportunities for NZ writers closing soon

Source: Creative New Zealand – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Opportunities for NZ writers closing soon


Applications close on 7 March (next Friday) for two major literary opportunities for New Zealand writers.


The Michael King Writers’ Fellowship


This $100,000 fellowship is available to established New Zealand authors of any literary genre with a significant publication record. It is offered annually for writers working on a major project which will take two years or more to complete.


The Fellowship was offered for the first time in 2003, and was renamed in recognition of the late Dr Michael King for his contribution to literature and his role in advocating for a major fellowship for New Zealand writers.


Previous recipients are Owen Marshall, Vincent O’Sullivan, C.K. Stead, Rachel Barrowman, Neville Peat, Dame Fiona Kidman, Philip Simpson, Kate De Goldi, Peter Wells, Dr Peter Simpson and Fiona Farrell.


More about eligibility


More about how to apply


The University of Iowa Writers’ Residency


This residency is open to nationally recognised writers who have published at least one volume of work. Applicants at an early stage of their career, as well as more established writers, are eligible to apply. The residency is part of the University of Iowa’s International Writing programme and runs for three months, approximately August to November. A Creative New Zealand grant goes towards airfares, accommodation and living expenses for the selected writer.


Previous recipients of the residency include: Gordon McLauchlan, Vivienne Plumb, James Norcliffe, Penelope Todd, Brian Falkner, Kathy White, David Hill, Lynley Hood and Jeffrey Paparoa Holman and Craig Cliff.


More about eligibility


More about how to apply


For more information on the programme, please visit the University of Iowa’s website


For more information on these opportunities, contact:


Jill Rawnsley | Senior Arts Adviser – Literature

09 373 3077 jill.rawnsley@creativenz.govt.nz


 


For media enquiries, please contact:


Rebecca Lancashire


Senior Communications Adviser | Kaiārahi Matua Whakawhitiwhiti Kōrero


Creative New Zealand | Toi Aotearoa


Mob: +64 27 677 8070 | DDI: +64 4 498 0725 | Fax: +64 4 471 2865


E: rebecca.lancashire@creativenz.govt.nz | W: creativenz.govt.nz


 


 


 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

Youth Mentorship Programme Puts Out Call For Budding Eleanor Cattons

Source: Creative New Zealand – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Youth Mentorship Programme Puts Out Call For Budding Eleanor Cattons


Three lucky secondary school students are again being given the opportunity to work with three of New Zealand’s best professional authors in order to hone their writing skills and develop their craft.


The NZSA Youth Mentoring Programme 2014 is now open and offers three aspiring young writers (15-18) a 10 hour mentorship – not surprisingly the mentorships are hotly contested.  


Previous recipient Ashlee-Ann Sneller of Kaitaia devoted her time with poet Siobhan Harvey to a poetry collection and says the mentorship was an amazing experience and helped her secure an English scholarship for Auckland University, not to mention a page dedicated to her writing in her school year book.


“The mentorship helped me to see myself as an ‘real’ writer and gave me the confidence to show my work to the public. Before the programme, I THOUGHT I was a writer. Now I know I AM a writer.” 


The intent of the programme is to foster and develop emerging writing talent with the support of established authors. The NZSA has run a highly successful mentoring programme for writers since 1999 and it is sponsored by Creative New Zealand.


Deadline: 1 April 2014.


 


For further information and application forms visit www.authors.org.nz 


Or email programmes@nzauthors.org.nz


National Office:  PO Box 7701, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141 – Tel: (09) 379 4801


 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

Exceptional dancer to teach at New Zealand’s foremost training institution

Source: Creative New Zealand – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Exceptional dancer to teach at New Zealand’s foremost training institution


Qi Huan, who has been a leading dancer with the Royal New Zealand Ballet for the past nine years, is leaving the company to take up a teaching role at the New Zealand School of Dance (NZSD).


Qi will teach classical ballet, with a particular emphasis on the training of male dancers, to the School’s full-time tertiary level students who aspire to become professional dancers. Over its 47 year history the NZSD has developed an international reputation for training dancers at the highest level. Graduates have gone on to fulfil international careers and many have made significant contributions as choreographers and company directors.


In addition to being an exceptional dancer, Qi has always had a passion for teaching. He has a Bachelor Degree of teaching and performing arts in ballet, and taught at the Beijing Dance Academy from 2003 – 04 before coming to New Zealand to join the RNZB.


Just back from a triumphant tour of the US dancing with the company, Qi Huan, who also had a lead role in Toa Fraser’s 2013 film ‘Giselle’, said “To become a ballet teacher has always been one of my future goals and dreams. I’d love to share all my dance knowledge and stage experience with the younger generation.”



“I am so excited to explore and learn more as well as work with all the dedicated and disciplined people at NZSD“, Qi added.


NZSD Director Garry Trinder feels Qi joining the faculty will be important for the School’s links within the Asia-Pacific Region and for the future of its teaching. “It has been a long term aspiration to have Qi teach at NZSD. On occasion he has been a guest teacher at the School and always impressed me with his dedication, intelligence and commitment to excellence”.


Garry said, “I am proud that we have been able to appoint a person with such an impressive professional background. I am convinced that with Qi Huan on our teaching staff we can continue to improve the high international standards expected of the world’s finest dance conservatoires”.


Ethan Stiefel, Artistic Director of the Royal New Zealand Ballet, said of Qi’s new move, “Qi Huan has made so many substantial and inspiring contributions to the Royal New Zealand Ballet during his nine years with the company. Qi will be missed, but I look forward continuing conversations with him, in terms of his maintaining an association with the RNZB, in some capacity. The RNZB wishes him the very best in his new role of teaching and developing a new generation of dancers at the New Zealand School of Dance“.


Photo 1: Three Short Ballets in NYC: Qi Huan, photographed by Ross Brown for the Royal New Zealand Ballet.


Photo 2: Qi Huan performing in the Royal New Zealand Ballet’s ‘Giselle’, photographed by Brendan Bradshaw.


 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

New cultural exchange opportunity for Māori artists in Canada – apply now

Source: Creative New Zealand – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: New cultural exchange opportunity for Māori artists in Canada – apply now

Indigenous Dance Programme, The Banff Centre. Image courtesy of The Banff Centre.


A new initiative will give contemporary Māori dancers and writers a chance to develop their arts practice at one of the world’s largest arts and creativity incubators.


Over the next two years Canada’s Banff Centre – renowned for commissioning, supporting and producing new creative works – will reserve one spot for a Māori artist in each of their indigenous dance and writing residency programmes.


This opportunity, funded by Creative New Zealand as part of their Cultural Exchange Programme, will see the selected Māori artists share the special experience with other indigenous artists from various backgrounds and nations.


“We have worked with our friends at The Banff Centre to create this opportunity so tangata whenua can exchange their artistic skill and cultural knowledge with other first nation peoples and develop ongoing partnerships,” says Cath Cardiff, Creative New Zealand’s Senior Manager Arts Policy, Capability and International.


“We hope it will also open up new opportunities for New Zealand artists, in particular Māori, to develop their practice and to present their work to international audiences.”


“We are sincerely grateful for this partnership with Creative New Zealand, and we look forward to working together over the next two years in support of strong and vibrant Indigenous arts communities in Canada, New Zealand, and around the world,” says Sandra Laronde, Director of Indigenous Arts at The Banff Centre.


“Indigenous Arts at The Banff Centre is proud to continue to reach across Canada to communities around the world, inspiring programmes and creative residencies in disciplines including music, dance and choreography, visual and digital arts, and writing.”


The Indigenous Dance Residency (NZD$10,285) is a four-week intensive programme which involves daily classes as well as creating a new choreographic work that will be performed as part of the Banff Summer Arts Festival at The Banff Centre.


The Indigenous Writing Programme (NZD$12,125) comprises two weeks of writing time at The Banff Centre and 10 weeks working online from home or work space with a mentor (editor). The resident writer will receive one-on-one editorial feedback with the faculty, and present an excerpt of their work alongside award-winning faculty writers in a reading and spoken word series at The Banff Centre. Preference will be given to playwrights in 2014.


The residencies will be offered once a year in 2014 and 2015 in a pilot run.


Applications for this year’s Indigenous Writing Programme close on 1 May 2014 and on 10 May 2014 for the Indigenous Dance Residency. Artists should apply directly to The Banff Centre.


For more information and how to apply, please visit The Banff Centre website: http://www.banffcentre.ca/indigenous-arts/


 


 


For media enquiries, please contact:


Jasmyne Chung

Communications Adviser, Creative New Zealand

M +64 27 838 8868 | jasmyne.chung@creativenz.govt.nz


 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

New exhibition: Best in Show 2014

Source: Creative New Zealand – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: New exhibition: Best in Show 2014

Designers from left to right: Angela Misela, Hayden Maunsell, Toby Vanderspeck, Candice Karaitiana.


What: Best in Show 2014


Where: Objectspace, 8 Ponsonby Rd, Auckland 


When: 15 March – 26 April 


Gallery hours: Mon – Sat, 10am – 5pm. Free admission.


 


Public Programme:


Saturday 15 March, 11am – A chance to hear from some of the 27 exhibitors, as they discuss their work at Objectspace.


 


From bacteria-inspired wallpaper design, to interactive jewellery, 3D printed shoes, and brightly coloured prints evolving into a fashion collection – the annual graduate exhibition Best in Show is back.


Now in its tenth year of showcasing outstanding graduate work in applied arts and design, Best in Show 2014 is both a platform for brand new makers and designers stepping into the professional arena, and an opportunity for the public to view the newest exciting work emerging from tertiary organisations around New Zealand. This year, work from 27 graduates will be on display.


The exhibition spans diverse art disciplines – including textile design, fashion, graphic design, jewellery, industrial design, and furniture design. With abundant experimentation in material and technique, the students’ collection swings from the sleek and sophisticated, to simple and restrained, and downright quirky.   


Creating an opportunity for students to apply for entry has ensured that Best in Show 2014 presents a truly national selection with work coming from:  Auckland University of Technology, Eastern Institute of Technology, Hungry Creek Art & Craft School, Manukau Institute of Technology, Massey University, Northtec, Otago Polytechnic, Unitec, Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design and Whitireia Polytechnic. 


Many previous Best in Show exhibitors such as Corrina Hoseason, Guy Hohmann, Anzac Tasker, and Kristin D’Agostino have quickly gone on to achieve local and international recognition.


 


For more information please contact:


Jaqui KnowlesProgramme Manager, Objectspace


P: (09) 376-6216 


E: jaqui@objectspace.org.nz


W: www.objectspace.org.nz


 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

Call for nominations to Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award

Source: Creative New Zealand – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Call for nominations to Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award


Arts Access Aotearoa is calling for nominations to the Arts Access Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award 2014. This award recognises a performing arts company, festival, venue, producer, gallery or museum that best demonstrates its commitment to developing its audiences by becoming more accessible to disabled and Deaf people. 


The closing date for nominations is Friday 14 March 2014


The Arts Access Awards is the new name for the annual Big ‘A’ Awards, introduced in 2007. The name change was prompted by a desire to reflect more accurately what the awards recognise and to align them more closely with Arts Access Aotearoa’s purpose.


The Arts Access Awards 2014 will be presented at a ceremony in the Banquet Hall of Parliament on Tuesday 29 July. 


Last year’s recipient was Fortune Theatre in Dunedin. Artistic Director Lara Macgregor says receiving the award brought the theatre to the forefront of the community and heightened its profile and initiatives.


“It was a huge vote of confidence for Fortune Theatre and consolidated our vision to continue providing audio described performances, and keep accessibility at the forefront of our vision as we move forward in our fortieth year.


“The prize money enabled us to build better access into our website. This year, a grant through the Make A Difference Fund means we’re able to provide audio description to our blind and vision impaired patrons for the first four shows in 2014.” 


The recipient of this award will receive $2500, to be used to progress its work in improving access to disabled audiences. In addition, a representative will be hosted to attend the awards ceremony at Parliament. 


The Arts Access Creative New Zealand Arts For All Award complements Arts Access Aotearoa’s Arts For All programme. A partnership programme with Creative New Zealand, it works with representatives from the disability sector and local councils to support arts and cultural organisations, companies, venues and producers to improve their accessibility.


You are able to nominate yourself or others. For more information and nomination forms, please contact:


Claire Noble, Arts Access Aotearoa


T: 04 802 4349


E: claire.noble@artsaccess.org.nz


W: www.artsaccess.org.nz


 


Photo: Lara Macgregor and Stephen Wainwright at the 2013 Arts Access Awards.

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

New Christchurch sculpture inspired by Cathedral spire

Source: Creative New Zealand – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: New Christchurch sculpture inspired by Cathedral spire


A new sculpture by prominent Canterbury artist Neil Dawson, launched today, was inspired by his attempts to draw the damaged Christ Church Cathedral Spire from memory.  


The 14.5-metre tall aluminium work is based on the geometry of the Cathedral spire, and serves as reminder of it, and the other neo-gothic structures that perished or were damaged in the earthquakes.


Dawson hopes ‘Spires’ in the city’s Latimer Square will stimulate discussion about artwork in the city and the value of design and the creative industries as Christchurch moves further away from recovery into the rebuild.


“There has been so much loss in the city, including a loss of location. There is a need for markers and reminders. I wanted here to recreate the experience of looking up at a point in the sky, something that Christchurch has missed for some time now.’’


Creative New Zealand provided nearly $10,000 towards the project, The Canterbury Community Trust $5,000 and the remainder of the work and materials estimated at more than $200,000 has generously been provided by the artist and over 20 local businesses with substantial in-kind sponsorship.


“So many good Christchurch people have contributed in so many ways to this beautiful piece of art. It’s incredibly rewarding to see it all come to fruition and we hope this shows what can be achieved when people roll their sleeves up and go for it,” says Helen Trappitt of Lewis Bradford Consulting Engineers, who carried out the structural engineering and project management.


‘Spires’ will remain in Latimer Square temporarily with Christchurch City Council approving the land use until 2016.


Neil Dawson has an exhibition of small sculptures that explore the concept and design of ‘Spires’ opening at Page Blackie Gallery, Wellington from 5 March 2014. 


 



Photos by Geof Wilson.


 


 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

150 years since attack on Rangiaowhia in the NZ Wars

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: 150 years since attack on Rangiaowhia in the NZ Wars

‘Me maumahara tātou – we must remember’ 

Friday 21 February represents 150 years since an attack on the village of Rangiaowhia in the Waikato War (1863–1864). The events that unfolded at the small settlement near Te Awamutu are still debated by historians and the descendants of Ngāti Apakura. 

At daybreak on 21 February 1864, the advance guard of General Duncan Cameron’s 1000-strong force of cavalry and foot soldiers attacked the largely undefended Rangiaowhia. Twelve Māori were killed, including women, children and the elderly. Several houses were burned down, with villagers incinerated inside. Five British soldiers died. 

Tom Roa, Ngāti Apakura elder and Chair of Ngā Pae o Maumahara, the group established to commemorate and raise awareness of the war says this day will be remembered with much pain and grief for the local Iwi of Ngāti Apakura 

“I pāhuatia ō mātou tūpuna i Rangiaowhia – our ancestors were killed unguarded and defenceless at Rangiaowhia but I hope this commemoration will help to heal the grief, appease the anger and bring peace for Ngāti Apakura”. 

To mark this day, the local Iwi will unveil a plaque at dawn on the site they believe the houses stood before they were burned down. At 8.30am, a silent hīkoi will make its way to the Catholic Cemetery and dignitaries will join the hīkoi en route. During the procession, local kuia will be situated at significant points along the way to lead the hīkoi with their karanga, a wailing lament to those victims whose lives were lost on that tragic day. 

Speeches will be made at 9am by both a Māori and a Pākehā historian. A pōwhiri will take place once the hīkoi returns to the Hairini Hall at 10.15am, with further speeches in memory of those who died at Rangiaowhia. 

“We will never forget the atrocity that occurred at Rangiaowhia, however, this will be a commemoration where Ngāti Apakura will be given the opportunity to commemorate their ancestors with oratory and traditional chants,” says Roa. 

Photographs taken at the Rangiaowhia commemoration will be made available during the course of the day for media use. To download, please register by emailing info@alphapix.co.nz and go to the following link: http://bit.ly/MxPzS1  

 

 

The Waikato War was the key campaign in a long conflict which is known today as the New Zealand Wars.  The New Zealand Wars were in large part fought over land. In the decades after 1840, the European population grew rapidly. Māori land ownership was recognised by the Treaty of Waitangi, and many Māori had no wish to sell their land so newcomers could settle on it.  

The Kīngitanga (King Movement) was founded in the 1850s to unify those opposed to land sales, and to assert Māori authority and mana over their land. From 1860 there was open warfare as British and colonial forces fought to open up the North Island for settlement by Europeans. 

 The Waikato War began in July 1863. Over the following months British forces fought their way south towards the Kīngitanga’s agricultural base around Rangiaowhia and Te Awamutu. On the way they outflanked formidable modern at Meremere and Pāterangi, and captured the at Rangiriri. In April 1864 Kīngitanga warriors under Rewi Maniapoto were heavily defeated at Ōrākau in the last battle in Waikato. By mid-1864, 400,000 hectares of Waikato land had passed under Crown control. 

Up to 3000 people died during the New Zealand Wars – the majority of them Māori. And for many Māori the wars were only a prelude to the loss of their land through confiscation or the operations of the Native Land Court. 

This loss of land had particularly devastating economic, social, environmental and cultural consequences for Waikato–Tainui. But the iwi always upheld its mana and asserted its right to compensation in the face of official indifference.

Since the 1990s, the Crown has negotiated Treaty Settlements to redress the historical grievances in the Waikato region and New Zealand as a whole. 

In 1995 the first major settlement of an historical confiscation, or raupatu, claim was agreed between the Crown and Waikato-Tainui.  The claim was settled for a package worth $170 million, in a mixture of money and Crown-owned land.  

The settlement was accompanied by a formal apology, delivered by Queen Elizabeth II in person during her 1995 visit to New Zealand. The Crown apologised for the invasion of the Waikato and the subsequent indiscriminate confiscation of land. 

For more information about the Waikato War and the New Zealand Wars see:

www.thewaikatowar.co.nz

www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/war-in-waikato

www.teara.govt.nz/en/new-zealand-wars

David Green, Battlefields of the New Zealand Wars: A Visitor’s Guide, Penguin, Auckland, 2010

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.