Iranian Short Film Night – Auckland

MIL OSI – Source: Show Me Shorts Film Festival

Headline: Iranian Short Film Night – Auckland

Show Me Shorts presents a night of Iranian short films. Join us to celebrate the cinema of Iran with a vibrant collection full of life – love, friendship, family ties, animation and dreams of escaping to greener pastures.

When: 7pm, Wednesday 10 April 2019

Where: The Kingslander, 470 New North Road, Auckland

Tickets: $15 (cash door sales only available if not sold out prior)

Buy tickets here

There are six short films by top Iranian filmmakers:

  • Exit Toll by Mohammad Najarian Dariani
  • Retouch by Kaveh Mazaheri
  • Humans by Mashaallah Mohammadi
  • Breathing by Farshid Ayoobinejad
  • Lunch Time by Alireza Ghasemi
  • Vision by Soheil Amirsharifi
  • Icky by Parastoo Cardgar

This is an informal and fun event, and all are welcome. The screening takes place in the upstairs function room at The Third Eye. All films screen in the Persian language (Farsi) with English subtitles. Total run time is approx 92 minutes. No allocated seating, so first in best dressed. The bar will be open with food and drink available for purchase.

FAQs

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

No, just your name and email confirmation is fine.

What are my transport/parking options for getting to and from the event?

Parking lot and street parking is available.

Will there be door sales?

Previous events have sold out online before the night so it is recommended to pre-book. If online sales do not sell out there may be limited door sales. Door sales are cash only.




Iranian Short Film Night – Wellington

MIL OSI – Source: Show Me Shorts Film Festival

Headline: Iranian Short Film Night – Wellington

Show Me Shorts presents a night of Iranian short films. Join us to celebrate the cinema of Iran with a vibrant collection full of life – love, friendship, family ties, animation and dreams of escaping to greener pastures.

When: 7pm, Wednesday 10 April 2019

Where: The Third Eye, 30 Arthur St, Te Aro, Wellington

Tickets: $15 (cash door sales only available if not sold out prior)

Buy tickets here

There are six short films by top Iranian filmmakers:

  • Exit Toll by Mohammad Najarian Dariani
  • Retouch by Kaveh Mazaheri
  • Humans by Mashaallah Mohammadi
  • Breathing by Farshid Ayoobinejad
  • Lunch Time by Alireza Ghasemi
  • Vision by Soheil Amirsharifi
  • Icky by Parastoo Cardgar

This is an informal and fun event, and all are welcome. The screening takes place in the upstairs function room at The Third Eye. All films screen in the Persian language (Farsi) with English subtitles. Total run time is approx 92 minutes. No allocated seating, so first in best dressed. The bar will be open with food and drink available for purchase.

FAQs

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

No, just your name and email confirmation is fine.

What are my transport/parking options for getting to and from the event?

Parking lot and street parking is available.

Will there be door sales?

Previous events have sold out online before the night so it is recommended to pre-book. If online sales do not sell out there may be limited door sales. Door sales are cash only.




Calling interns for 2019

MIL OSI – Source: Show Me Shorts Film Festival

Headline: Calling interns for 2019

Come work with us.

Opening Night at Awards Ceremony in Auckland

Want to get work experience at New Zealand’s leading international short film festival? Hone your administration skills; learn about film distribution and exhibition; be part of a passionate team that creates vital screen industry events.

Show Me Shorts works to connect audiences with quality short films; celebrate excellence in short film making; and foster the New Zealand short film community.  We do this primarily by organising a film festival that screens in cinemas nationwide each October. There are also a number of other workshops, screenings and events.

Two opportunities are now available for outstanding individuals to join our (mostly volunteer) team.

The 2019 Festival Intern and Marketing Intern will be two bright, proactive, conscientious, film-loving individuals. The Interns need to be punctual, resourceful, energetic, eager to learn, resilient and extremely well organised. Interns need to have their own laptop as some work will be done remotely, and preferably have a driver’s license.

The hours are flexible, ideally in two blocks of five hours (10hrs per week) at our Grey Lynn office where we will provide access to a computer, phone, printer, WIFI and other services as required. The role will commence asap and conclude in December (exact dates to be confirmed). August onwards is the busiest period, and during the festival in October we need you to be available to work some additional evenings and weekends.

The Festival Intern will help with the production of the festival and events, including:

  • Correspondence and admin
  • Assisting with funding applications
  • Liaising with filmmakers, cinemas and post-production
  • Organising censorship of filmsData entry and spreadsheet organisation
  • Distributing customer surveys at screenings
  • Event support (Opening Nights, Short Film Talks, etc.)

The Marketing Intern will help us spread the word about the festival and our events, including:

  • General correspondence and admin
  • Assisting with marketing and promotion
  • Copy writing for the website, social media and email newsletters
  • Assisting in the coordination of design and print deliverables
  • Building databases of and communications with potential audiences
  • Event support (Opening Nights, Short Film Talks, etc.)

These are unpaid opportunities, but the festival will offer at the conclusion of the internship:

  • A written reference
  • Flexible working hours to fit around work or study
  • The opportunity to learn how a world-class film festival operates
  • Any out-of-pocket expenses reimbursed
  • The chance to work with a motivated team and be a part of an exciting national event

To apply email your CV and cover letter to Mark Prebble at info@showmeshorts.co.nz by 5pm April 1, 2019.




New Zealand Flag half-masting directive 15 March 2019

MIL OSI – Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Headline: New Zealand Flag half-masting directive 15 March 2019

Notification for the New Zealand Flag to be flown at half mast with immediate effect.

Tēnā koutou katoa

At the request of the Prime Minister, the Right Honourable Jacinda Ardern, the New Zealand Flag is to be flown at half-mast on all Government and public buildings with immediate effect as a mark of mourning and respect for the victims of the Deans Avenue Mosque and Linwood Avenue Mosque terror attacks. The New Zealand Flag is to continue to be flown at half-mast until further notice.

This instruction applies to all Government Departments, buildings and naval vessels which have flag poles and normally fly the New Zealand Flag.

The flag is half-masted by first raising it to the top of the mast and then immediately lowering it slowly to the half-mast position. The half-mast position will depend on the size of the flag and the length of the flagpole. The flag must be lowered to a position recognisably “half-mast” to avoid the appearance of a flag which has accidentally fallen away from the top of the flagpole. As a guide, the flag should be more than its own depth from the top of the flagpole. At the end of the day, the flag should be raised again to the top of the flagpole before being fully lowered.

For more information about half-masting the flag, visit http://www.mch.govt.nz/nz-identity-heritage/flags/half-masting-new-zealand-flag.

If you have any questions, please contact Kartini Havell on (04) 499 4229 or kartini.havell@mch.govt.nz. Media enquiries should be directed to 027 622 0468. 

Annual history awards reveal New Zealand’s stories

MIL OSI – Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Headline: Annual history awards reveal New Zealand’s stories

Deeper insights into the life and times of Helen Kelly and Te Rauparaha are among the New Zealand stories to be revealed through this year’s annual New Zealand History Awards, Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage Chief Historian Neill Atkinson said today.


Te Raparaha, chief of the Kawias, Hall, R., fl 1840s. Image sourced from Alexander Turnbull Library. Author Ross Calman is preparing a new bilingual edition of Tāmihana Te Rauparaha’s biography of Te Rauparaha.

“These are just two recipients of the 10 awards totalling $106,025 which have been distributed to authors researching subjects as diverse as changes to the marine environment, public sector reform, and trans-Tasman literary culture,” Neill Atkinson said.

“Christchurch writer Rebecca Macfie’s biography of the late Helen Kelly will cover the early influences on her life and her rise in the trade union movement from 1989, where she challenged workplace law and campaigned for workers’ rights, until her death from cancer aged 52.

“Wellington’s Ross Calman is preparing a new bilingual edition of Tāmihana Te Rauparaha’s biography of Te Rauparaha, one of the only full-length biographies written in te reo Māori in the nineteenth century.

“Another Wellingtonian, Nick Bollinger, is researching a history of New Zealand’s counterculture between 1960 and 1975.

“Dr Rosi Crane’s project will delve into the history of the first 70 years of the Otago Museum. From Dunedin, Dr Crane will specifically cover the working lives of the museum’s first three curators.

“Administered by Manatū Taonga, the awards support projects an independent panel believe will make a significant contribution to the study of New Zealand history and society,” Neill Atkinson said.


Kurī, polynesian dog on display at Otago museum. Kane Fleury, © Otago Museum. Sourced from Wikimedia Commons. Dr Rosi Crane’s project will look at the history of the first 70 years of the Otago Museum.

This year’s recipients:

  • Nick Bollinger, Wellington, Revolutions per minute: the counterculture in New Zealand, $12,000
  • Helen Bones, New South Wales, The evolution of the Tasman writing world in the twentieth century, $12,000
  • Ross Calman, Wellington, He pukapuka tātaku i ngā mahi a Te Rauparaha nui/A record of the life of the great Te Rauparaha: A bilingual edition of Tāmihana Te Rauparaha’s Life of Te Rauparaha, $12,000
  • John Cookson, Christchurch, Little republics: county and municipal government in New Zealand to 1940, $9345
  • Rosi Crane, Dunedin, Skeletons in the attic: a history of the Otago Museum, $4230
  • Victoria Froude, Bay of Islands, Largely unseen – a history of New Zealand’s marine environments from pre-human times to today $11,950
  • Nadia Gush, Hamilton, Out & About? A social history of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer women in Aotearoa New Zealand during the 1980s, $12,000
  • Catherine Knight, Ashhurst, The long shadow of reform: The impacts of the 1980s public sector reforms on environmental stewardship in New Zealand, $12,000
  • Rebecca Macfie, Christchurch, The life and times of Helen Kelly, $8500
  • Vincent O’Malley, Wellington, The New Zealand wars, $12,000

2019 Aotearoa Short Film Lab Participants Announced

MIL OSI – Source: Show Me Shorts Film Festival

Headline: 2019 Aotearoa Short Film Lab Participants Announced

We are proud to announce the names of eight screenwriters who  have been selected from 72 applicants, to participate in the 2019 Aotearoa Short Film Lab.

Congratulations to:

  • Gary Davies (Waikato)
  • Grace Goulter (Auckland)
  • Mia Maramara (Auckland)
  • Stef Harris (Nelson)
  • Sarah Harpur (Kapiti)
  • Steven Chow (Wellington)
  • Victoria Thompson (Australia)
  • Michael Kam (Singapore)

Aotearoa Short Film Lab is a prestigious hothouse mentoring scheme for screenwriters and aspiring screenwriters to workshop new ideas for short film. Established in 2010 as a partnership between Show Me Shorts and Script to Screen, the Lab offers six New Zealand short film makers the opportunity to develop their short film concepts and scripts with the guidance and advice of experienced industry mentors during a full-day workshop.

Two international short film makers will also participate in the workshop. Victoria Thompson from Australia and  Michael Kam from Singapore will fly to Auckland to develop their scripts with the expertise of local mentors.

Festival Director of Show Me Shorts, Gina Dellabarca, who was among the selection panel commented: “After reading this year’s Lab applications, there is no doubt that our short film screenwriters are leading the way in putting forward an increasingly diverse range of types of story. Hollywood could learn a lot from these bold and talented filmmakers. It is heartening for the industry that screenwriters and aspiring screenwriters are working on such a variety of stories. I only wish we could include more of them in our Lab.”

The mentors guiding participants to develop their stories are experienced short film and feature film screenwriters: Michael Bennett (CowMatariki), Shuchi Kothari (Coffee & AllahApron Strings), Zia Mandviwalla (NightshiftAmadiEating Sausage), Dianne Taylor (Apron StringsBeyond the Known World), Matthew Saville (Hitch HikeDive) and Alyx Duncan ( The Tide Keeper).

Previous Short Film Lab participants have described the interactive workshop as “invaluable” and many projects have gone on to be funded and produced. Films developed with the assistance of the Lab have premiered at the Berlin Film Festival (I’m Going to Mum’s), NZ International Film Festival (Charmer, Tree) and Show Me Shorts Film Festival (Zinzan, Baby?).

Aotearoa Short Film Lab 2019 is brought to you by:

        

The Aotearoa Short Film Lab is possible thanks to support from Pub Charity Ltd, the Media, Film and Television department of the University of Auckland and New Zealand Film Commission.

                        




2018’s biggest laughs

MIL OSI – Source: Show Me Shorts Film Festival

Headline: 2018’s biggest laughs

Here at Show Me Shorts we try to pack in as many different styles and genres as we can into our festival programme, but something that will always stick out to us is a film that makes us laugh out loud.

Comedy is one of the hardest film genres to nail, but when it’s done right it can be magical. Laughter is cathartic, laughter is life-affirming and laughter can be a doorway into a rich emotional journey.

Here are three of the funniest films from our 2018 programme. They show three very different kinds of comedy and three different ways the filmmakers have used humour to draw us into their stories.

First up is the delightful Repugnant, landslide winner of our Calibrate Legal/Patrick McGrath Barrister People’s Choice Award.

Gay conversion therapy is a serious and terrifying issue, but apply it to dogs and it’s comedy gold. Kiwi writer/director Kyan Krumdieck uses satire and absurdity to critique this awful practice. However, he treats his characters with warmth and affection so you can understand how they’ve reached such extreme views. Excellent performances from Donogh Rees and scene-stealer Fergis the pug make Repugnant a relatable and hilarious crowd-pleaser.

At the other end of the humour spectrum is South African director Grant de Sousa’s deadpan romance It’s Complicated.

Shy Andy has fallen in love online and is about to meet his cyber-girlfriend in the flesh for the first time. But his best friend Nigel is a bit worried by the fact that she is a vampire. Kelvin Wong’s clever script takes a situation everyone can recognise – disliking a friend’s new partner – and mines it for great comic affect and genre gags. It’s easy to see why It’s Complicated has been a festival hit around the world.

Anyone who’s ever used a public toilet has been repulsed by another user’s bathroom etiquette. In Water Closet (aka Toilet) Simeon Duncombe ponders the question – what if toilets could fight back?

This grotesquely high-concept film works because of two bravura performances: 1. actor and stuntman Allan Henry, whose physical mastery as the unfortunate drunk man who peed on the wrong floor is truly impressive. 2. the technical wizardry of the set itself. Duncombe designed the floodable set as well as writing, directing and shooting Water Closet. He deservedly won the NZFC Special Jury Prize at Water Closet‘s world premiere at Show Me Shorts and the film has since become a Vimeo Staff Pick.




Let’s talk. Tuia 250 – a conversation about our nation

MIL OSI – Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Headline: Let’s talk. Tuia 250 – a conversation about our nation

This year a commemoration marking 250 years since the first onshore encounters between Māori and Europeans will prompt New Zealanders to have conversations about our history, led by co-chairs of the Tuia – Encounters 250 National Coordinating Committee, former Prime Minister Dame Jenny Shipley and voyaging expert Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr.

The centrepiece of the commemoration will be a flotilla of vessels that celebrates the long voyaging traditions of Aotearoa New Zealand. From October to December the flotilla will carry these stories to communities across the country.

“Tuia – Encounters 250 (Tuia 250) is an opportunity to understand and be informed about New Zealand’s voyaging and navigation traditions and to share those stories about when Māori, Cook, Tupaia, Banks and others met in 1769,” says Dame Jenny Shipley.

“We believe New Zealanders are ready to take this chance to hold honest and sometimes awkward conversations about the arrivals, encounters and settlement of New Zealand, to guide our shared future.

“Tuia 250 will encourage kōrero (discussion) and reflection, and enable a more balanced telling of our stories, so we speak openly and respectfully about our history. But it’s also about acknowledging all people who have chosen to call New Zealand home – whether their ancestors or family arrived on a waka, a ship or on a Boeing last week.”

Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr says Tuia 250 encourages New Zealanders to acknowledge great voyaging traditions of Te Moana Nui a Kiwa (the Pacific) and the feats of European explorers.

“This week Tuia 250 will have a presence at the kapahaka festival Te Matatini. The waka Pumaiterangi will be in the Wellington and Porirua Harbours representing innovation and skill that existed in 1769 and before that time,” says Hoturoa Barclay-Kerr.

Dame Jenny and Hoturoa both agree “Tuia 250 provides a huge opportunity for us all as New Zealanders and is a moment not to be missed as we shape our future together.

Te Matatini brings Aotearoa’s dynamic Māori culture to Wellington

MIL OSI – Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Headline: Te Matatini brings Aotearoa’s dynamic Māori culture to Wellington

Aotearoa’s vibrant and dynamic Māori culture will be front and centre stage at the biennial Te Matatini festival taking place in Wellington for the first time in 20 years, Bernadette Cavanagh Chief Executive Manatū Taonga, Ministry for Culture and Heritage said today.

“Te Matatini ki te Ao 2019 is a fantastic opportunity for New Zealanders and visitors alike to see Māori culture and performing arts at their finest,” Bernadette Cavanagh says. 

Te Matatini ki te Ao street art at Wellington’s Waitangi Park.

“Kapa haka brings our nation’s stories to life connecting people and places with our unique Māori heritage. Manatū Taonga is proud to support Te Matatini as its core funder.

“Kapa haka makes a significant contribution to New Zealand’s national identity and how we are seen internationally. It also has an important role in Māori language renewal throughout the country. 

“Festival goers will be experiencing Te Mita Tini (Te Matatini’s Māori language strategy) first-hand with the use of te reo Māori encouraged by the many stall holders in the event village. 

“As well as running the festival, Te Matatini Society supports and develops competitions for kapa haka in the regions including in schools and has a positive role in youth leadership programmes. 

“Additionally, we know kapa haka has important social, economic and cultural benefits and research also tells us kapa haka encourages healthy lifestyles and has a powerful effect on educational outcomes.

“Up to 65,000 tickets are expected to be sold over the four-day festival hosted by Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Raukawa ki te Tonga and Te Atiawa me ngā iwi o Taranaki whānui. 

This huge participation and spectator involvement with a total of 46 teams from across Aotearoa and Australia show the ongoing value and growth of kapa haka.

“My best wishes and thanks to every competitor for sharing their talent and experience with New Zealand and the world.

“Kapa haka is an all-inclusive activity and I encourage young and old to get along to this whānau friendly event and to visit us in our tent on the site,” Bernadette Cavanagh said. 

Further information

Manatū Taonga will be sharing a space on the concourse with other cultural agencies:

Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision

Pouhere Taonga Heritage NZ

Te Rua Mahara o te Kāwanantanga Archives New Zealand

Puna Matauranga o Aotearoa National Library of New Zealand

Te Tuma Whakaata Taonga NZ Film Commission

Toi Aotearoa Creative NZ

Six designs submitted for National Erebus Memorial

MIL OSI – Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage

Headline: Six designs submitted for National Erebus Memorial

Concept designs for a new National Erebus Memorial have now been submitted to Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage, says Ministry for Culture and Heritage chief executive Bernadette Cavanagh.

The six designs are available on the Ministry for Culture and Heritage website: www.mch.govt.nz/national-erebus-memorial/final-designs

“Six anonymous design teams selected in December were asked to submit concept designs,” Ms Cavanagh says.

“The designers were provided with comments from the families of the Erebus victims and given the opportunity to talk to some family members in this phase of the process.

“Feedback from the families on the designs will be presented to the National Erebus Memorial Design Panel when they meet in March to evaluate the designs. The Panel will be recommending the finalist to the Prime Minister.

“It’s a significant milestone and provides a real sense of the progress of this project.”

Ms Cavanagh is also pleased to announce that two Erebus family members (yet to be selected) will be joining the Design Panel in March.

The 40th anniversary of the Erebus accident will be marked in November this year, with a Memorial planned to be established in early 2020. Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage is leading the project.

Dove-Myer Robinson Park / Taurarua Pā, commonly known as the Parnell Rose Gardens, Auckland, site for the National Erebus Memorial.

Find out more about the National Erebus Memorial on the Ministry for Culture and Heritage website.