150 years since The Battle of Ōrākau in the Waikato War

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: 150 years since The Battle of Ōrākau in the Waikato War

The commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Ōrākau in the Waikato War (1863–1864) will take place on Tuesday 1 April. One of the most well-known battles of the New Zealand Wars, it took place between 31 March and 2 April 1864. Seventeen British troops died at Ōrākau, while the number of Māori killed is estimated at 150.

On 1 April, there will be a special ceremony close to the site where the battle took place, attended by senior government representatives including His Excellency the Governor-General, Lt Gen The Rt Hon Sir Jerry Mateparae, Hon Christopher Finlayson and local government officials. Iwi leaders will include King Tuheitia, elder statesman and former Cabinet Minister the Honourable Koro Wetere, Paramount Chief of Tuwharetoa Sir Tumu Te Heuheu and the Kingmaker, Anaru Tarapīpipi Tamehana.

Tom Roa, Ngāti Apakura elder and Chair of Ngā Pae o Maumahara, the group established to commemorate and raise awareness of the war says the battle of Ōrākau was a decisive shift for iwi throughout the motu (country).

“One hundred and fifty years ago the battle of Ōrākau galvanized Iwi under the mantle of the Kīngitanga to defend their sovereignty, their mana and their lands and Tainui will never forget the honour and dignity shown by those Iwi who fought alongside them at Ōrākau,” says Roa.

To mark this day, there will be a flag raising and karakia at 6am. The first pōwhiri will be held at 7:30am where Waikato-Tainui will welcome iwi from around the motu. The second official welcome will be at 11am for all local and central government representatives and personnel. Addresses from the Governor-General and Hon Christopher Finlayson will be between 1pm and 2pm, followed by the unveiling of a plaque and a New Zealand Defence Force memorial service. The ceremony will conclude with a procession of parekawakawa (wreaths) and laying of wreaths in memory of those who died in the battle.

“There will be several tributes paid to those who gave their lives defending their lands and defending the mana of the Kīngitanga and we will always remember this battle because it was a critical moment in the history of our people. Takoto mai koutou i roto i te Atua,” says Roa.

The commemoration will be held adjacent to the memorial on Arapuni Road where the battle is believed to have taken place, located 4 kilometres south-east of the Waikato town of Kihikihi, south of Te Awamutu.

Photographs taken at the commemoration will be made available during the course of the day for media use. To download, please register by emailing info@alphapix.co.nz and go to the following link: http://bit.ly/Orakau.

The Battle of Ōrākau

In late March 1864 about 300 Māori, led by Rewi Maniapoto and including Ngāti Maniapoto keen to reassert their mana over the area, hastily built a . Brigadier-General G.J. Carey led an 1100-strong strike force of British and colonial troops, with the first assaults by units on the morning of the 31 March.

Artillery was brought up and the was encircled. Over the next 48 hours, a sap (covered trench) was dug towards the so a field gun could pound the walls at short range. The troops made three more futile charges against the deceptively weak-looking structure, losing men each time.

By midday on 2 April, the third day of the siege, Cameron suggested that the Māori surrender. The response was defiance – ‘Ka whawhai tonu mātou, Ake! Ake! Ake! – We will fight on for ever and ever!’ – and a vow that the women would die along with the men. Several hours later, the entire garrison – men, women and children – left the in a disciplined wedge formation, broke through a weak point in the British cordon and headed for the Pūniu river, three kilometres away. Many were hunted down and killed by cavalry and Forest Rangers, but between half and two-thirds of the defenders crossed the river and reached safety.

Ōrākau was a major setback for the Kīngitanga, but it did not end their ability to fight. Further defensive lines were soon built to the south and east, screening the remaining territory held under the Māori King’s mana. The next major battle would be fought in Tauranga – at Gate – several weeks later.

The Battle of Ōrākau inspired Rudall Hayward’s two dramatic films entitled Rewi’s Last Stand (1925 and 1940).

The Waikato War

The Waikato War was the key campaign in a long conflict which is known today as the New Zealand Wars.

The New Zealand Wars were in large part fought over land. In the decades after 1840, the European population grew rapidly. Māori land ownership was recognised by the Treaty of Waitangi, and many Māori had no wish to sell their land so newcomers could settle on it.

The Kīngitanga (King Movement) was founded in the 1850s to unify those opposed to land sales, and to assert Māori authority and mana over their land. From 1860 there was open warfare as British and colonial forces fought to open up the North Island for settlement by Europeans.

The Waikato War began in July 1863. Over the following months British forces fought their way south towards the Kīngitanga’s agricultural base around Rangiaowhia and Te Awamutu. On the way they outflanked formidable modern at Meremere and Pāterangi, and captured the at Rangiriri.

In April 1864 Kīngitanga warriors under Rewi Maniapoto were heavily defeated at Ōrākau in the last battle in Waikato. By mid-1864, 400,000 hectares of Waikato land had passed under Crown control.
Up to 3000 people died during the New Zealand Wars – the majority of them Māori. And for many Māori the wars were only a prelude to the loss of their land through confiscation or the operations of the Native Land Court.

This loss of land had particularly devastating economic, social, environmental and cultural consequences for Waikato–Tainui. But the iwi always upheld its mana and asserted its right to compensation in the face of official indifference.

Since the 1990s, the Crown has negotiated Treaty Settlements to redress the historical grievances in the Waikato region and New Zealand as a whole.

In 1995 the first major settlement of an historical confiscation, or raupatu, claim was agreed between the Crown and Waikato-Tainui. The claim was settled for a package worth $170 million, in a mixture of money and Crown-owned land.

The settlement was accompanied by a formal apology, delivered by Queen Elizabeth II in person during her 1995 visit to New Zealand. The Crown apologised for the invasion of the Waikato and the subsequent indiscriminate confiscation of land.

For more information about the Waikato War and the New Zealand Wars see:

www.thewaikatowar.co.nz
www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/war-in-waikato
www.teara.govt.nz/en/new-zealand-wars
David Green, Battlefields of the New Zealand Wars: A Visitor’s Guide, Penguin, Auckland, 2010.
 

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

$2.5 million funding boost to restore Canterbury Provincial Council Buildings

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: $2.5 million funding boost to restore Canterbury Provincial Council Buildings

The Christchurch Earthquake Appeal Trust and the Ministry for Culture and Heritage today announced they will jointly provide funding of $2.5 million for the Canterbury Provincial Council Buildings, to be used towards restoration and reconstruction of its Armagh and Durham street stone towers. When completed, this work is intended to enable the adjacent wooden buildings to re-open for public use as soon as possible.

Widely acknowledged as New Zealand’s most outstanding example of High Victorian Gothic Revival architecture, the buildings were severely damaged in the 22 February 2011 earthquake. The Stone Chamber (1865) collapsed immediately, compounded by subsequent seismic activity. The Armagh Street stone tower collapsed and the Durham Street stone tower was damaged to the point where deconstruction was necessary.

Dr Rod Carr, Trustee of Christchurch Earthquake Appeal Trust says, “Given the unique heritage value of these buildings and their importance as a venue for cultural and other activities, the Christchurch Earthquake Appeal Trust is very pleased to help get this project underway”.

At this point the Armagh and Durham Street stone towers have been deconstructed down to a height of 2-4m above ground level. The $2.5 million is to be put to their restoration and reconstruction, opening up the principal public access way to the buildings, through the Armagh Street tower. Funding of $1.25 million is being provided by the Ministry for Culture and Heritage to match the $1.25 million granted by the Appeal Trust. The restoration of the two towers supports a landmark recovery project, significant to the Christchurch City Council’s contribution towards rebuilding of the city.

“This is great news for Christchurch and will be well-received locally and internationally. I am excited we have secured this funding so we can preserve some of Christchurch’s unique story and make significant parts of this iconic building available for public use once more. So much has already been lost here in Christchurch it’s great to celebrate this good news and take this positive step forward in restoring the Canterbury Provincial Building,” says Christchurch Mayor Lianne Dalziel.

Dr Anna Crighton, Chair of Canterbury Earthquake Heritage Buildings Fund says, “The Canterbury Provincial Council Buildings are the last remaining purpose-built provincial parliament buildings in New Zealand. The ornate and detailed stone council chamber has a particularly significant heritage value and these were the first buildings listed as a Category 1 Historic Building by the New Zealand Historic Places Trust.”

Assessments by engineers confirmed that the timber portions of the buildings are repairable, however the stone towers and chamber will require major works. Christchurch City Council has been deconstructing, stabilising and making safe all the buildings, ensuring they are weather proof. The remains of the Stone Chamber have been stabilised but a decision on whether to rebuild this part of the complex has yet to be made.

The total cost of restoration and reconstruction of the Provincial building complex is yet to be determined, but it is estimated to exceed the total insurance pay-out of approximately $30 million. Work is expected to commence this year.

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

150 years since attack on Rangiaowhia in the NZ Wars

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: 150 years since attack on Rangiaowhia in the NZ Wars

‘Me maumahara tātou – we must remember’ 

Friday 21 February represents 150 years since an attack on the village of Rangiaowhia in the Waikato War (1863–1864). The events that unfolded at the small settlement near Te Awamutu are still debated by historians and the descendants of Ngāti Apakura. 

At daybreak on 21 February 1864, the advance guard of General Duncan Cameron’s 1000-strong force of cavalry and foot soldiers attacked the largely undefended Rangiaowhia. Twelve Māori were killed, including women, children and the elderly. Several houses were burned down, with villagers incinerated inside. Five British soldiers died. 

Tom Roa, Ngāti Apakura elder and Chair of Ngā Pae o Maumahara, the group established to commemorate and raise awareness of the war says this day will be remembered with much pain and grief for the local Iwi of Ngāti Apakura 

“I pāhuatia ō mātou tūpuna i Rangiaowhia – our ancestors were killed unguarded and defenceless at Rangiaowhia but I hope this commemoration will help to heal the grief, appease the anger and bring peace for Ngāti Apakura”. 

To mark this day, the local Iwi will unveil a plaque at dawn on the site they believe the houses stood before they were burned down. At 8.30am, a silent hīkoi will make its way to the Catholic Cemetery and dignitaries will join the hīkoi en route. During the procession, local kuia will be situated at significant points along the way to lead the hīkoi with their karanga, a wailing lament to those victims whose lives were lost on that tragic day. 

Speeches will be made at 9am by both a Māori and a Pākehā historian. A pōwhiri will take place once the hīkoi returns to the Hairini Hall at 10.15am, with further speeches in memory of those who died at Rangiaowhia. 

“We will never forget the atrocity that occurred at Rangiaowhia, however, this will be a commemoration where Ngāti Apakura will be given the opportunity to commemorate their ancestors with oratory and traditional chants,” says Roa. 

Photographs taken at the Rangiaowhia commemoration will be made available during the course of the day for media use. To download, please register by emailing info@alphapix.co.nz and go to the following link: http://bit.ly/MxPzS1  

 

 

The Waikato War was the key campaign in a long conflict which is known today as the New Zealand Wars.  The New Zealand Wars were in large part fought over land. In the decades after 1840, the European population grew rapidly. Māori land ownership was recognised by the Treaty of Waitangi, and many Māori had no wish to sell their land so newcomers could settle on it.  

The Kīngitanga (King Movement) was founded in the 1850s to unify those opposed to land sales, and to assert Māori authority and mana over their land. From 1860 there was open warfare as British and colonial forces fought to open up the North Island for settlement by Europeans. 

 The Waikato War began in July 1863. Over the following months British forces fought their way south towards the Kīngitanga’s agricultural base around Rangiaowhia and Te Awamutu. On the way they outflanked formidable modern at Meremere and Pāterangi, and captured the at Rangiriri. In April 1864 Kīngitanga warriors under Rewi Maniapoto were heavily defeated at Ōrākau in the last battle in Waikato. By mid-1864, 400,000 hectares of Waikato land had passed under Crown control. 

Up to 3000 people died during the New Zealand Wars – the majority of them Māori. And for many Māori the wars were only a prelude to the loss of their land through confiscation or the operations of the Native Land Court. 

This loss of land had particularly devastating economic, social, environmental and cultural consequences for Waikato–Tainui. But the iwi always upheld its mana and asserted its right to compensation in the face of official indifference.

Since the 1990s, the Crown has negotiated Treaty Settlements to redress the historical grievances in the Waikato region and New Zealand as a whole. 

In 1995 the first major settlement of an historical confiscation, or raupatu, claim was agreed between the Crown and Waikato-Tainui.  The claim was settled for a package worth $170 million, in a mixture of money and Crown-owned land.  

The settlement was accompanied by a formal apology, delivered by Queen Elizabeth II in person during her 1995 visit to New Zealand. The Crown apologised for the invasion of the Waikato and the subsequent indiscriminate confiscation of land. 

For more information about the Waikato War and the New Zealand Wars see:

www.thewaikatowar.co.nz

www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/war-in-waikato

www.teara.govt.nz/en/new-zealand-wars

David Green, Battlefields of the New Zealand Wars: A Visitor’s Guide, Penguin, Auckland, 2010

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

150 years since the battle of Waiari in the New Zealand Wars

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: 150 years since the battle of Waiari in the New Zealand Wars

150 years ago tommorow on 11 February the battle of Waiari in Waikato took place. It was one of the battles of the Waikato War (1863–1864), during which between 20 and 40 Māori warriors were killed, and six British troops died. To commemorate the event a special service is being held close to the site.

The Waiari commemoration will begin at 10am on Tuesday morning with a haka waerea and karakia followed by speeches from both a Māori and Crown historian. The precise location of the battle is unknown and the service will take place in the vicinity on local farmland. Following the ceremony, guests will be welcomed on to Pūrekireki Marae.

“By knowing the facts of our past it gives us an insight into what happened 150 years ago, a time when the lives of our ancestors were fraught with conflict and tension as they fought over land Māori owned and the land that Pākehā wanted”, says Tom Roa, Ngati Apakura elder and Chair of Ngā Pae o Maumahara, the group established to commemorate and raise awareness of the war.

Ngā Pae o Maumahara seeks to contribute to debate throughout the country on nationhood and nation building. Roa says tomorrow’s event will remember the engagement at Waiari as a site where lives on both sides were lost. 

“It will embrace the spirit of commemoration of a sacred site where blood was shed, and that this place where lives were lost be remembered for the important role it played in the conflict from which this nation was built. By respecting these sacred sites as well as the people who played a major role there, will allow us as a nation, to ‘own’ our past, and learn its lessons”, Roa says.

During the battle at Waiari on 11 February in 1864, Captain Charles Heaphy was almost killed while trying to rescue a wounded soldier, and subsequently received a Victoria Cross, the first member of a non-regular unit in the British Empire to be awarded such an honour.

Photographs taken at the commemoration will be uploaded during the course of the event for media use. To access, please go to the following link and enter the password ‘tpk‘: http://bit.ly/1iDTgk7

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust has developed a smartphone app featuring a driving tour of important locations in the Waikato War www.thewaikatowar.co.nz.

Historical background: 

The Waikato War was the key campaign in a long conflict which is known today as the New Zealand Wars.

The New Zealand Wars were in large part fought over land. In the decades after 1840, the European population grew rapidly. Māori land ownership was recognised by the Treaty of Waitangi, and many Māori had no wish to sell their land so newcomers could settle on it.

The Kīngitanga (King Movement) was founded in the 1850s to unify those opposed to land sales, and to assert Māori authority and mana over their land. From 1860 there was open warfare as British and colonial forces fought to open up the North Island for settlement by Europeans.

The Waikato War began in July 1863. Over the following months British forces fought their way south towards the Kīngitanga’s agricultural base around Rangiaowhia and Te Awamutu. On the way they outflanked formidable modern at Meremere and Pāterangi, and captured the undermanned at Rangiriri.

In April 1864 Kīngitanga warriors under Rewi Maniapoto were heavily defeated at Ōrākau in the last battle in Waikato. By mid-1864, 400,000 hectares of Waikato land had passed under Crown control.Up to 3000 people died during the New Zealand Wars – the majority of them Māori. And for many Māori the wars were only a prelude to the loss of their land through confiscation or the operations of the Native Land Court.

This loss of land had particularly devastating economic, social, environmental and cultural consequences for Waikato–Tainui. But the iwi always upheld its mana and asserted its right to compensation in the face of official indifference.

Since the 1990s, the Crown has negotiated Treaty Settlements to redress the historical grievances in the Waikato region and New Zealand as a whole.In 1995 the first major settlement of an historical confiscation, or raupatu, claim was agreed between the Crown and Waikato-Tainui.  The claim was settled for a package worth $170 million, in a mixture of money and Crown-owned land. The settlement was accompanied by a formal apology, delivered by Queen Elizabeth II in person during her 1995 visit to New Zealand. The Crown apologised for the invasion of the Waikato and the subsequent indiscriminate confiscation of land.

For more information about the Waikato War and the New Zealand Wars see:

www.thewaikatowar.co.nz

www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/war-in-waikato

www.teara.govt.nz/en/new-zealand-wars

David Green, Battlefields of the New Zealand Wars: A Visitor’s Guide, Penguin, Auckland, 2010

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

Waitangi Day community events to be held nationwide

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Waitangi Day community events to be held nationwide

On Waitangi Day, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage is supporting 58 community events across New Zealand that commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi.

These events range from the largest, which takes place at Bastion Point in Auckland and last year attracted 30,000 people, to a small gathering on the Chatham Islands featuring karakea from kaumatua, kapa haka and kai. Others will include dawn ceremonies, marae open days, music, poetry and dance performances, plus art and craft workshops.

Every region in the country will be holding Waitangi Day events. Please see the following link for a complete list:

http://www.mch.govt.nz/funding-nz-culture/ministry-grants-awards/commemorating-waitangi-day-fund/2014-successful-applicants

The Commemorating Waitangi Day Fund has distributed $288,000 this year for events that commemorate the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, and which promote nation and community building. The fund aims to encourage a wider mix of communities to take part in Waitangi Day events.

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

NZFC Greenlights Professional Development Services Programme

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: NZFC Greenlights Professional Development Services Programme

The New Zealand Film Commission is pleased to announce the first recipients of the Professional Development Services Programme.

Making of the ‘Beyond the Edge’ image is courtesy of the New Zealand Film Commission.

The three year programme is aimed at building capacity in the film sector, by ensuring filmmakers, from the emerging to the experienced level, are able to keep improving skills while extending their international professional networks.

The programme sits alongside the NZFC’s other core priorities of funding films, script development and administering co-productions and the Government’s incentive schemes.

We received a number of comprehensive proposals for upskilling producers, directors, writers, editors and screen practitioners for the next three finanical years.  We are pleased to announce support for the following.

Script to Screen
Script to Screen will run a programme including two extensive labs (aimed at developing a pool of strong film writers and further strengthening the local development culture) and mentorship programmes tailored to the needs of individual writers, script development practitioners, directors and producers.

New Zealand Writers Guild 
NZWG will run an annual script market showcasing new projects and their writers.

Screen Directors Guild of New Zealand
SDGNZ will run a number of workshops, mentorships, seminars and masterclasses aimed at developing directors’ skills and confidence.  Several of these initiatives will see partnerships with actors organisations and will benefit both professions.

Women in Film and Television
WIFT will run a programme for producers focusing on finance, international sales and domestic distribution while increasing knowledge of particular co-production territories and capitalising on selected producers’ experiences in key international markets.

DocEdge 
DocEdge is devising a workshop developing ideas with a particular interest in interactive digital storytelling.

“These initiatives reflect an increased emphasis on developing the careers of people already working in the industry,” says NZFC Chief Executive Dave Gibson. “We’ve also kept some money in reserve and will continue to talk to interested parties to ensure that the needs of the industry are being met.” 

To read more about the Professional Development Services Programme please go here.

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Flags to be flown at half-mast Tuesday 10 December 2013

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: Flags to be flown at half-mast Tuesday 10 December 2013

In recognition of the memorial service for Nelson Mandela, to be held at the FNB Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa on Tuesday 10 December 2013, the Prime Minister, the Right Honourable John Key has requested that all New Zealand flags be flown at half-mast on the day of the service, Tuesday 10 December 2013 (NZDT).

This instruction applies to all Government Departments and Government buildings which have flag poles.

The flag is half-masted by first raising it to the top of the mast and then immediately lowering it slowly to the half-mast position.  The half-mast position will depend on the size of the flag and the length of the flagpole.  The flag must be lowered to a position recognisably “half-mast” to avoid the appearance of a flag which has accidentally fallen away from the top of the flagpole.  As a guide, the flag should be more than its own depth from the top of the flagpole.  At the end of the day, the flag should be raised again to the top of the flagpole before being fully lowered.

For more information about half-masting the flag, visit http://www.mch.govt.nz/nzflag/flying.html

If you have any questions, please contact Ashley Mackenzie-White on 021 121 5764.

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

New Zealand’s analogue television era ends

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: New Zealand’s analogue television era ends

New Zealand’s last remaining analogue TV signals were closed down in the early hours of this morning, ushering Kiwi viewers into a new era of digital-only television.  To mark the event, Broadcasting Minister the Hon Craig Foss and Going Digital mascot Seymour the Digital Dog completed the shut-down process at the Waiatarua transmission site in West Auckland.

Minister Craig Foss switching off the the Waiatarua TV Tower analogue transmitter.

“The shut-down of analogue TV services across the Upper North Island, ends a three-year campaign to migrate viewers to digital TV services,” Going Digital National Manager Greg Harford said today.  “Going digital offers viewers more channels, better pictures and new services, but also frees up radio spectrum for next-generation mobile phone and mobile broadband services, which are expected to be faster and cheaper in the long-run.

“Going Digital has run a comprehensive community outreach and marketing campaign over three years to alert viewers to changes in the way TV is broadcast,” said Mr Harford.

“The nation has gone digital in four stages over the past 15 months, and from today Upper North Island viewers will only be able to watch TV if they have Freeview, Sky or Igloo.  While not all viewers have made the transition, experience from other parts of the country suggests that those who have not gone digital ahead of the deadline will do so over the coming days.”

Mr Harford invited viewers to check in with family members and friends that they were still able to watch TV this morning.  “Viewers can go digital at any time by getting Freeview, Sky or Igloo and our team is available today on 0800 838 800 to assist people who need information about going digital.

“Going Digital has provided support to more than 30,000 of those households likely to face the greatest financial and technical challenges in moving to digital TV.  The Package is available to those who do not already have digital TV, and who are:

– 75 and over (at the time of switchover) with a Community Services Card; or

– receiving a Veteran’s Pension;

– receiving a Supported Living Payment for Health Reasons (formerly the Invalid’s Benefit); or

– former recipients of the Veteran’s Pension or Invalid’s Benefit who transferred to New Zealand Superannuation at age 65 or after.” 

The Going Digital Targeted Assistance Package has closed in Hawke’s Bay and the South Island, but remains open to eligible people in the Lower North Island until 3 January 2014 and the Upper North Island until 1 March 2014.

Mr Harford offered his thanks to everyone who had helped get the word out about digital television during the three-year campaign.  “Going Digital has worked closely with community and neighbourhood groups, as well as members of the broadcasting industry to engage with TV viewers, and I thank everyone involved for the support.”

Viewers who have questions about the move to digital TV can call 0800 838 800 (7am to 9pm today, and 8.30am to 5pm Monday to Friday) or visit www.goingdigital.co.nz.

The claims and opinions made in this statement are those of the release organisation and are not necessarily endorsed by, and are not necessarily those of, LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners. Also in no event shall LonewolffilmsNZ or its owners be responsible or liable, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the above release content.

150 years since pivotal battle in New Zealand Wars

Source: New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage – Press Release/Statement:

Headline: 150 years since pivotal battle in New Zealand Wars

150 years ago tomorrow (20 November) the battle of Rangiriri in the Waikato was one of the decisive battles of the Waikato War (1863–1864) and formed a key part of the New Zealand Wars. The significant conflict shaped the Crown’s relationship with Waikato-Tainui Iwi, and was a seminal moment in New Zealand’s history with 47 British troops killed and 41 Māori. The 150th anniversary of the battle is being commemorated on 20 November at the battle site.

The Rangiriri commemorations have been organised by local community and iwi representatives who will welcome all guests at 10am Wednesday morning including the NZ Defence Force.  However, one of the unique elements of this particular powhiri for Waikato-Tainui will be the tribal tradition of re-opening the portals to those who died in battle 150 years ago and pay homage to their bravery and courage with oratory, haka and traditional chants.

“This will be a memorable moment for our people who have never forgotten our tupuna who died fighting for our land, our mana and our sovereignty” says Tom Roa, Chair of Ngā Pae o Maumahara, the group established to commemorate and raise awareness of the war.

Later in the day, the NZ Defence Force and Iwi will attend the local cemetery to salute the European soldiers who also died at Rangiriri with a reading of the Odes, a gun salute and a traditional Iwi prayer to wrap up the 150 year commemoration.

Ngā Pae o Maumahara seeks to contribute to debate throughout the country on nationhood and nation building.

“The importance of commemorating the events of 1863–1864 for all New Zealanders is that it marks a moment in history that was fraught with conflict and tension. The gateway at Rangiriri still wears the upside down British flag, an historic symbolic gesture. Today it’s a reminder of our past and our ongoing work to keep building our future,” Ngā Pae o Maumahara Chair Tom Roa said.

“We want to promote the themes of reconciliation and transformation which we believe will resonate with all New Zealanders.”

Through the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process, the New Zealand Government is providing redress for breaches of the Treaty resulting from the wars of the 1860s and the confiscation of Maori land that followed the wars. This process is building stronger relationships between Māori and the Crown.
“In re-telling the stories from this past and reflecting on each other’s perspectives, we are encouraging a dialogue that relates to the process of reconciliation that the Crown and Iwi Māori have embarked upon with much success,” Mr Roa said.

The 150th anniversary is also a chance for New Zealanders to better understand the history of the Waikato War.

“Visiting Rangiriri is a great way to learn about the War,” said Ministry for Culture and Heritage Chief Historian Neill Atkinson.

“It is one of the most accessible battle sites of the New Zealand Wars and visitors can still see the outline of the central redoubt”.

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust has recently erected new interpretation panels on the site. This information is also available as an app for smartphones at www.thewaikatowar.co.nz.

The Waikato War was the key campaign in a long conflict which is known today as the New Zealand Wars.

The New Zealand Wars were in large part fought over land. In the decades after 1840, the European population grew rapidly. Māori land ownership was recognised by the Treaty of Waitangi, and many Māori had no wish to sell their land so newcomers could settle on it.

The Kīngitanga (King Movement) was founded in the 1850s to unify those opposed to land sales, and to assert Māori authority and mana over their land. From 1860 there was open warfare as British and colonial forces fought to open up the North Island for settlement by Europeans.

The Waikato War began in July 1863. Over the following months British forces fought their way south towards the Kīngitanga’s agricultural base around Rangiaowhia and Te Awamutu. On the way they outflanked formidable modern at Meremere and Pāterangi, and captured the undermanned at Rangiriri. In April 1864 Kīngitanga warriors under Rewi Maniapoto were heavily defeated at Ōrākau in the last battle in Waikato.

The casualties at Rangiriri on 20 November 1863 were among the heaviest of the New Zealand Wars: 47 British troops and a similar number of Māori were killed. In fact, more British were killed at ‘Bloody Rangiriri’ than in any other battle of the New Zealand Wars. But their victory opened the Waikato basin to the imperial forces. By mid-1864, 400,000 hectares of Waikato land had passed under Crown control.

Up to 3000 people died during the New Zealand Wars – the majority of them Māori. And for many Māori the wars were only a prelude to the loss of their land through confiscation or the operations of the Native Land Court.

This loss of land had particularly devastating economic, social, environmental and cultural consequences for Waikato–Tainui. But the iwi always upheld its mana and asserted its right to compensation in the face of official indifference.

Since the 1990s, the Crown has negotiated Treaty Settlements to redress the historical grievances in the Waikato region and New Zealand as a whole.

In 1995 the first major settlement of an historical confiscation, or raupatu, claim was agreed between the Crown and WaikatoTainui.  The claim was settled for a package worth $170 million, in a mixture of cash and Crown-owned land.

The settlement was accompanied by a formal apology, delivered by Queen Elizabeth II in person during her 1995 visit to New Zealand. The Crown apologised for the invasion of the Waikato and the subsequent indiscriminate confiscation of land.

For more information about the Waikato War and the New Zealand Wars see:

www.thewaikatowar.co.nz
www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/war-in-waikato
www.teara.govt.nz/en/new-zealand-wars
David Green, Battlefields of the New Zealand Wars: A Visitor’s Guide, Penguin, Auckland, 2010.

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